SOLD……Open house on Sat 3/15/14

Open house Sat 3/15/14

2:00 pm to 4:00 pm

3347 Zorina Way, Sacramento, CA 95826

Three bedroom two bath home in desirable neighborhood. Separate Living room and Family room. Central heating and air conditioning. Very nice covered patio in backyard. Seller asking only $199,900!

Can’t make the open house call me for your private viewing:

Realty World The Justice Team

Scarlett Justice/00880852

916-804-3500

 

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Congress passed the $8,000 tax credit extension!

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Congress passed an extension of the closing deadline for the Homebuyer Tax Credit, the Homebuyer Assistance and Improvement Act (H.R. 5623). The extension applies only to transactions that have signed contracts in place as of April 30, 2010, that have not yet closed. The legislation is designed to create a seamless extension; the new closing deadline for eligible transactions is now September 30, 2010. There will be no gap between June 30 and the date the President signs the bill into law. Extending the tax credit closing deadline will help provide additional stability to real estate markets across the nation.

Great news for those that were not able to make the cut off of June 30th due to the backlog this created.

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7 Things all borrowers should know about FHA loans

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“We have seen home buyer interest in FHA loans go from practically zero three years ago to upwards of 87 percent today,” said Christopher Gardner, founder and president of FHA Pros, LLC. “Despite this rapid rise in popularity, many buyers still do not fully understand the benefits of these loans, and we believe it’s time to change that.”

1. FHA Loans Are Not Only For Lower-Income Borrowers. FHA loans are available to everyone. In fact, even Bill Gates can get one. There is no maximum income restriction associated with FHA loans. Borrowers do need to substantiate income and assets by submitting proper documentation. This requirement ensures that borrowers are well-vetted and truly able to afford their future homes.

2. FHA Loans Are Not Only For First-Time Buyers. Many people believe FHA loans are available only to first-time homebuyers. This is not the case. Whether borrowers are making their first home purchase or their fifth, they can look to FHA loans as a home financing option.

3. FHA Loans Are Not Just Small Loans; In Fact, Loan Amounts Can Be As High As Almost $800,000. The government recently raised the maximum loan amount from its original cap of $362,790 to $793,750 as a way to help stabilize the housing market. The amount a buyer can borrow varies from county to county. Later this summer, condo buyers interested in FHA loans can visit www.checkfhaapproval.com to instantly identify FHA-approved condo associations and review maximum loan amounts for a given location.

4. FHA Loans Are Not Affiliated With The Section 8 Housing Program. While both programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), FHA loans have nothing to do with low-income subsidized housing. FHA loans are simply mortgages insured by FHA. This insurance provided by the federal government allows lenders to lend more freely by assuring them that they will be repaid in the event of default. Most traditional lenders, including Wells Fargo & Co., JP Morgan Chase and Citigroup are able to provide FHA loans to their customers.

5. FHA Loans Are Often More Affordable Than Conventional Loans. While FHA loans typically offer the same interest rates as other loans, borrowers benefit from a much lower down payment of as low as 3.5 percent.

6. FHA-Approved Condo Developments Are More Desirable To Buyers. With 87 percent of home buyers indicating that they plan to use FHA loans, condo associations that are not FHA approved are missing out on a significant pool of prospective buyers. Under rules in place since February 2010, an entire condominium development must now apply to HUD and be granted FHA approval before a buyer can purchase a unit in an association with an FHA loan or before an existing unit owner can refinance into an FHA loan.

Due to the general unwillingness of today’s lenders to extend credit with respect to conventional loans, many borrowers find that FHA is their best bet. Lenders don’t mind lending when the federal government (FHA) assures them of repayment.

Homeowners associations (HOAs) should note that although FHA-insured mortgages might be easier to obtain, they are not “risky” loans, due in large part to the strict “full documentation” requirements placed on borrowers.

Individual buyers or sellers can initiate the approval process or current owners can encourage their HOA to apply. More information about the FHA- approval process is available at www.getfhaapproval.com.

7. FHA Loans Are Assumable. In addition to lower down-payment and credit-qualifying requirements as compared to conventional loans, FHA loans are assumable. This means that when a seller with an FHA loan sells his or her property, the loan and its financing terms (interest rate) can be transferred to the new buyer. This unique feature will certainly make a property more valuable in times of rising interest rates.

(reprinted with permission)

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Rent or buy? What works best for you?

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First time home buyers have a lot to consider this summer when making the decision to rent or buy a home: interest rates are at all-time lows and prices are at or near their lowest in years.

Still, deciding whether to buy a home or rent an apartment can be a complicated decision. How do you know what’s right for you? Potential buyers should ask themselves several key questions before making this important decision.

1. What will monthly costs be, and can I afford the payments?
Keeping mortgage payments under 30 percent of your monthly income is a good rule of thumb. If you can’t keep mortgage payments below that, you may be better off renting for awhile.

2. What other debt do I have?
Total rent or mortgage payments plus credit obligations should not exceed 35 to 40 percent of monthly income. Talk to your lender and they will help you get ready to buy a home. 

3. What is my credit score? Can I qualify for a good interest rate?
A high credit score indicates strong creditworthiness, and that qualifies you for better interest rates on a mortgage. Maxing out on your credit lines and paying bills late will lower your credit score. The impact of a credit score on interest rates can be significant. For instance, a borrower with a score of 760 could pay nearly two percentage points less in interest on a mortgage than someone with a score of 620. Lower interest rates also mean lower monthly payments. If your credit score is low, you may want to delay buying a home until you can improve your score. Work with your lender, they can tell you what to do to improve your credit score. Don’t have a lender? Ask your Realtor, they can refer you one or more lenders that they work with.

4. How much will taxes, monthly maintenance, or other fees cost?
Owning a home means you’ll have to pay real estate taxes and other costs like insurance and maintenance. On the other hand, owning a home brings big tax savings at the end of the year. 

5. How many years will I stay here? Generally, the longer you plan to live someplace, the more it makes sense to buy. You’ll build equity in your home and have the satisfaction of knowing it is yours and you can paint or redecorate any way you want. There have also been studies that show children do better in school if the parents are homeowners.

If you need any help with this decision, your Realtor or Lender can provide you with a Rent vs Buy analysis form.  

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TAX CREDITS SET TO EXPIRE SOON

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First time home buyer tax credit

If you are looking for your first home the IRS will give you an $8,000 tax credit (maximum, or 10 percent of the sales price, whichever is less) on your federal tax return if you close escrow by April 30, 2010. The credit applies to homes purchased for $800,000 or less, and the credit does not require repayment if you live in this residence for three or more years. If you or your spouse have not owned a home in the last three years you qualify for this credit.

The full $8,000 credit is available to married couples filing a joint return whose modified adjusted gross income is $150,000 or less. You must be 18 on the date of purchase.

Exisiting Homeowner Tax Credit

If you already own a home, but  you want to move up, theres something for you too. Congress also granted existing homeowners a tax credit of up to $6,500 maximum or 10 percent of the purchase price, whichever is less.

To be eligible for this credit you must have lived in your current home for for five consecutive years out of the last eight and must purchase a new or existing home by April 30, 2010. You do not need to sell your current home to qualify for this credit. Single buyers with incomes up to $125,000 and married couples with incomes up to $225,000 may receive the maximum tax credit. Buyers with a written binding contract on April 30, 2010 have until July 1, 2010 to close escrow.

What’s the catch?

No catch. Neither tax credit requires repayment if you occupy the home for three years or longer. buyers who combine these credits with low intterest rates and low median sales prices will have a once in a generation chance to purchase more hme for their dollars.

Claim it

Use IRS form 5405 to claim either credit; the IRS requires a copy of your HUD 1 Settlement Statement to verify the purchase.

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Buying a home and not selling your current home?

As of October 2008 the lenders have changed the way they look at rental income if you are planning on renting out your current home and buying another home. The old rule of thumb where the lender gives you credit for 75% of rental income does not apply any longer.

FANNIE MAE rules as of August 1, 2008

It is much more difficult to qualify for the loan if you are keeping your current home and going to be renting it out and buying a new home. One of these three scenarios must apply:

1. Current home pending sale

  • The lender will count both house payments, the old house and the new house in the qualifying ratios unless there is an executed purchase contract on the old house and all the lenders financing contingencies have been cleared
  • Required cash reserves after closing; enough to make 6 months house payments on both properties, less if you can document 30% equity in the home you are selling

2. Existing home converts to a Second Home

  • Count both house payments, old and new in qualifying ratios
  • Require cash reserves of 6 months house payments on both properties, less if 30% equity in home converting to a second home

3. Existing home converts to a rental property

  • Count both house payments, old and new in qualifying ratios. Rent may be used to offset payment ONLY if a new appraisal verifies 30% equity, home is leased, and security deposit is verified
  • Cash reserves after closing, enough to make 6 months house payments on both properties

Bottom line-

Anytime you are thinking of retaining ownership in your current primary residence and need to close on a new primary residence, you must qualify with both payments and you have cash reserves of 6 months payments for both properties. The only time this does not apply is if you have 30% or more equity in the property you are retaining and a lease with a verified security deposit or the home is sold with a valid purchase contract and all financing contingencies have been removed.

Be sure and speak with your lender as soon as possible if you are thinking of retaining your current primary residence as a rental and purchasing a new primary residence. Your lender can advise you as to the best way to proceed.